Saturday, May 25, 2024

What Is The Best Antibiotic For Sti

Exactly How Is Chlamydia Spread What Is The Best Antibiotic For Chlamydia

How Can We Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Sexually Transmitted Infections?

You can get chlamydia by having vaginal, anal, or foreplay with someone that has chlamydia.

If your sex partner is male you can still get chlamydia even if he does not climax.

If you have actually had chlamydia and were dealt with in the past, you can still obtain contaminated once again. This can happen if you have unprotected sex with someone who has chlamydia.

If you are pregnant, you can offer chlamydia to your infant throughout childbirth.

What Is The Best Antibiotic For Chlamydia

Chlamydia is an usual sexually transmitted disease that can infect both males and females. It can cause severe, irreversible damage to a ladys reproductive system. What Is The Best Antibiotic For Chlamydia

This can make it hard or impossible for her to obtain expectant later. Chlamydia can additionally trigger a potentially deadly ectopic pregnancy a maternity that happens outside the womb.

When Would Be The Right Dosage And Time To Take Antibiotics To Prevent An Sti

Based on the limited research available, those at risk for exposure to bacterial STIs would either need to take a 100mg pill of doxycycline daily or take a 200mg dose after a sexual encounter .

A small qualitative study with Australian men who have sex with men indicated a preference for daily dosing. However, taking doxycycline as doxyPEP as opposed to taking it daily might be best in terms of reducing the amount of antibiotics taken.

As there are currently no clinical guidelines on dosage or formulation of doxycycline for STI prophylaxis, further research is required to answer this question with more certainty. More research is also needed regarding STI prophylaxis in people taking HIV PrEP, and for people living with HIV who are taking antiretrovirals.

Read Also: Are Antibiotics Free At Walgreens

When To Use Antibiotics

Antibiotics are specific for the type of bacteria being treated and, in general, cannot be interchanged from one infection to another. When antibiotics are used correctly, they are usually safe with few side effects. Health care providers are able to assess each patient individually to determine the correct antibiotic, dose and length of treatment.

However, as with most drugs, antibiotics can lead to side effects that may range from being a nuisance to serious or life-threatening. In infants and the elderly, in patients with kidney or liver disease, in pregnant or breastfeeding women, and in many other patient groups, antibiotic doses may need to be adjusted based upon the individual patient. Drug interactions can also be common with antibiotics.

Why Doctors Dont Recommend This Yet

An STI That You Probably Don

In most instances, healthcare professionals treat STIs based either on symptoms that you present with, the results of laboratory tests, or both. As STIs dont always have symptoms , it is recommended that people who have sex that puts them at risk test frequently and treat any STIs as soon as they are detected. It is also important to make sure that recent partners are treated.

Taking antibiotics prophylactically is not recommended yet, mainly due to major concerns about the development of antimicrobial resistance. Taking a drug and then catching an infection that easily develops resistance to it could further raise rates of resistance to that drug in the wider community. Resistance means that medications that were once effective at treating certain bacterial infections lose their ability to do so. Essentially, the bacterium outsmarts the medication, rendering it ineffective.

Resistant strains circulate within the population, resulting in the failure of treatments that had previously worked even in people not using antibiotics to prevent STIs. Gonorrhoea has evaded multiple classes of antibiotics, and few options remain available. Most recently, it has become resistant to azithromycin and therefore, this antibiotic is no longer recommended for treatment.

However, when it comes to using specific antibiotics to prevent specific STIs, its not all bad news see more under What about resistance?

Read Also: Can I Get Rid Of A Bladder Infection Without Antibiotics

Arguments In Favour Of Sti Prophylaxis

Molina introduced his argument by underlining the strong need for STI prophylaxis in specific groups, such as some MSM who have higher STI rates. For instance, data from MSM taking pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV in Australia showed a high incidence of STIs, with 2928 cases diagnosed in a group of 2981 men within a year. Interestingly, within this group, 25% of participants accounted for 76% of all STIs, indicating a specific subset of men who are at a higher risk of contracting an STI. Targeted STI prophylaxis would benefit groups such as these due to their increased risk and the possibility of onward transmission.

One approach already used to manage STIs is expedited treatment for sexual partners of an individual with a confirmed STI diagnosis, such as syphilis. This approach has been shown to successfully prevent syphilis developing in sexual contacts of individuals diagnosed within the preceding three months. It is recommended by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and represents an example of successful STI post-exposure prophylaxis .

While antibiotic resistance is a concern, there has been no documented resistance to doxycycline and other tetracycline antibiotics in either chlamydia or syphilis. Thus, for those STIs where prophylaxis has the potential to prevent infection, and where there is less chance of resistance developing, this approach could be feasible.

How Are Most Utis Diagnosed

There are several ways that your physician can diagnose a UTI. To provide the best antibiotic treatment for UTI, he or she needs to determine the location of the infection and whether your UTI is complicated. He or she also needs to rule out other conditions that present similarly to UTI, such as vaginitis or certain sexually transmitted diseases.

Most UTIs are diagnosed via urine test. In some instances, your healthcare provider may also order blood cultures and a complete blood count. These test results will confirm the type of bacteria, virus or fungus thats causing the infection.

Bacteria is to blame for the vast majority of UTIs, and theyre treated using a wide range of antibiotics. In rarer cases, where a virus is behind the infection, antivirals such as cidofovir are prescribed. Fungal UTIs are treated with antifungals.

Recommended Reading: What’s A Good Natural Antibiotic

Who Else Has A Higher Risk Of A Uti

There are a handful of other factors that can boost your odds of developing a UTI. They include:

  • Age
  • Pregnancy
  • Uncontrolled or inadequately controlled diabetes
  • Certain forms of birth control, such as diaphragms that put pressure on the urethra
  • Being sexually active, particularly with a new partner
  • Anatomical abnormalities or blockages along the urinary tract, such as kidney stones
  • Enlarged prostate

Because UTIs are so common, theyre also subject to a greater spread of misinformation than other conditions. Contrary to myth, you cannot get a UTI from using tampons or sanitary napkins, wearing tight clothing, riding a bike, or failing to urinate after intercourse.

Whether You Actually Need Antibiotics

Antibiotic Resistance in STIs

Ultimately the most important question everyone should ask is: Do you really need a course of antibiotics to treat your infection?

Generally speaking, you do not need an antibiotic every time you have an infection or might have an infection. They are not there to take “just in case” or to save for another occasion if you cut your treatment short. Both are bad ideas. Antibiotics do not work for colds or most upper respiratory infections.

Focus instead on avoiding infections by following three simple tips:

  • Get vaccinated for both bacterial and viral infections. Speak with your healthcare provider about which ones you need or are missing.
  • Wash your hands. This is not about being germ-phobic. It’s about understanding that your hands are among the most effective vectors of infection. Wash thoroughly, ideally with an antibacterial wash, whenever you are in a public place where you might pick up a bug.
  • Cover your mouth when you sneeze or a cough. Try to avoid doing so into your hands as this can spread an infection to others. Instead, use a tissue or the crook of your elbow. If in a confined space such as an airplane, consider wearing a disposable mask if you are ill or at risk of infection.

Read Also: Thomas Labs Antibiotics For Humans

Can Doctors Treat Utis Via Telemedicine

Telemedicine is an increasingly popular method of treating UTIs. In addition to being convenient, its also discreet and frequently more affordable than an in-office visit.

Since doctors cant collect a urine specimen via telemedicine, they will typically make their diagnosis using a series of questions that identify and analyze your symptoms. Your telehealth provider will also want to know if you have a history of UTIs, as well as if there are any other factors that may complicate your UTI, such as pregnancy or a chronic health condition.

Ultimately, the fact that UTIs are extremely common assists physicians in their ability to accurately diagnose and treat UTIs online. In the event that your UTI symptoms present themselves as more severe or as something else entirely, your telemedicine professional will instruct you to visit another physician in the office for a follow-up or to perform a urinalysis. Most of the time, however, your telehealth provider can diagnose your infection and prescribe antibiotics via video alone. Certain telehealth providers may be able to fill your prescription as well, which can save you the expense of going through a pharmacy.

How Common Are Utis

According to the National Kidney Foundation, 20% of women will experience a UTI at some point in their life. Of those, one in five will have a second UTI, and 30% of that narrowed group will have a third. Additionally, 80% of women who have three UTIs will have repeat infections after that.

Men also experience UTIs, but far less frequently. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to be sexually active to get a UTI, although it does increase your likelihood as intercourse can facilitate the spread of bacteria.

You May Like: One Time Dose Antibiotic For Uti

When Not To Use Antibiotics

Antibiotics are not the correct choice for all infections. For example, most sore throats, cough and colds, flu, COVID or acute sinusitis are viral in origin and do not need an antibiotic. These viral infections are self-limiting, meaning that your own immune system will usually kick in and fight the virus off.

Using antibiotics for viral infections can increase the risk for antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria cannot be fully inhibited or killed by an antibiotic, even though the antibiotic may have worked effectively before the resistance occurred. This can also lower your options for effective treatments if an antibiotic is needed eventually due to a secondary infection. Using unnecessary antibiotics also puts you at risk for side effects and adds extra cost.

It’s important not to share your antibiotic or take medicine that was prescribed for someone else, and don’t save an antibiotic to use the next time you get sick. It may not be the right drug for your illness.

To better understand antibiotics, its best to break them down into common infections, common antibiotics, and the top antibiotic classes as listed in Drugs.com.

Best Antibiotic For Stds

Almost one in ten HIV PrEP users report buying antibiotics ...

Ask U.S. doctors your own question and get educational, text answers â it’s anonymous and free!

Ask U.S. doctors your own question and get educational, text answers â it’s anonymous and free!

HealthTap doctors are based in the U.S., board certified, and available by text or video.

You May Like: What Antibiotic Is Good For Strep

Who Could Benefit From Using Antibiotics For Sti Prophylaxis

People at the highest risk of contracting bacterial STIs, especially those who may be at risk for repeated infections, may benefit most from taking STI prophylaxis. If you do not use condoms consistently, or at all, have multiple sexual partners and have had bacterial STIs in the past, you may be interested in the potential of this approach.

Bacterial STI prophylaxis can be taken regardless of HIV status. Many individuals who are HIV negative and on HIV PrEP use condoms less frequently or have stopped using them altogether. Similarly, some who are living with HIV also choose not to use condoms all of the time as an undetectable viral load prevents HIV transmission.

An accepted public health approach promotes the control of STIs among those at highest risk as a way of reducing STIs in the general population. An Australian modelling study supports this notion: it estimated that if half of Australian gay men took doxycycline as PrEP, and it was 70% effective against syphilis, then rates of syphilis would decrease by 50% after a year and 85% after a decade. Interestingly, the same finding applied if only 50% of the highest-risk group were taking doxycycline. This indicates that targeted interventions could have widespread community-level benefits.

Surveys in Australia, the US and the UK show high levels of interest among gay men and some healthcare providers in using doxycycline to prevent STIs, with some men already using this approach.

Help Us Make A Difference

Antibiotic resistance could affect everyone on the planet, and estimates suggest it will be responsible for 10 million deaths a year by 2050. We are the only charity in the world dedicated to researching this issue, supporting patients affected by resistant infections and educating the public on antibiotic resistance.

Please make a donation or support our work today, and help us ensure a safer future for our children and grandchildren.

Disclaimer: Any medical information referred to in or through our website is given for information purposes only and is not intended: to constitute professional advice for medical diagnosis or treatment to replace consultation with a qualified medical practitioner to advocate or recommend the purchase of any product or to endorse or guarantee the credentials or appropriateness of any health care provider. You are strongly advised to consult with an appropriate professional for specific advice tailored to your situation. Instead, information provided on our website is intended to provide helpful signposting towards further information and support and to provide an opportunity for you to simply share and discuss matters relating to antibiotic resistance with our Patient Support Officer.

Registered office:

Don’t Miss: How To Beat A Sinus Infection Without Antibiotics

What Happens If I Have A Multidrug

Patients who have had a poor clinical response to their first treatment will be screened to exclude multidrug resistant STIs. A poor clinical response means that the drug has not cured the infection. Multidrug resistant STIs are identified by taking vaginal or urethral swabs which are sent for culture and antibiotic sensitivity testing in a lab. Future drug treatments are guided by the results of the culture and antibiotic sensitivity test.

Multidrug resistant gonorrhoea may be treated with an injectable antibiotic called ertapenem. Multidrug resistant chlamydia may be treated with tablet antibiotics such as erythromycin or azithromycin. Multidrug resistant Mgen may be treated using tablet antibiotics called pristinamycin or minocycline.

Most Common Bacteria That Cause Utis

Gonorrhea and Super #Gonorrhea: Is This Common STI Becoming Resistant to #Antibiotics?

Based on a study by The National Center for Biotechnology Information, the bacteria most commonly associated with causing UTIs are:

  • Escherichia coli
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Enterococci

Based on the symptoms the patient is experiencing and before any testing is done to officially determine the infection type, the doctor prescribes first line antibiotics. For most UTIs, the prescribed antibiotic will cure the infection and not require any further testing.

Also Check: Plan B While On Antibiotics

How Quickly Will The Infection Spread Is There Anything I Can Do To Stop It Getting Worse

Most STIs take some time to show symptoms in infected people. It is possible to spread the infection to other people without knowing. This makes the management of STIs particularly challenging. Timely screening, access to sexual health clinics and patient contact tracing are important to stop these infections spreading.

If you think you have caught an STI, you should get yourself tested as soon as possible and wait for the test results before engaging in any further sexual activity.

The best way to prevent an STI is to use condoms during any type of sexual activity and have regular tests.

What Antibiotics Are Used To Treat Bacterial Utis

Once your physician has determined the location of your UTI and whether its complicated, he or she will likely suggest an antibiotic for treatment. Infections in the lower urinary tract are typically treated with oral medication , while upper-tract UTIs usually merit intravenous antibiotics.

All antibiotics require a prescription. This is, in part, to avoid the potential for antibiotic misuse, which can result in your body forming a dangerous resistance to antibiotics. Its also a way to ensure that you visit a healthcare provider when you have symptoms. If left untreated, even an uncomfortable but harmless lower-tract UTI can become more severe, particularly if its allowed to travel further up the urethra and take up residence in your kidneys.

Recommended Reading: Do You Need A Prescription To Get Antibiotics

What Antibiotics Treat Sti

The Type Of Bacteria Involved

Questionable antibiotics for STI

Bacteria are divided into two types depending on their external structure:

  • Gram-positive bacteria which has thick, waxy external layer
  • Gram-negative bacteria which has an extra lipid layer that acts as a barrier against certain antibiotics

When choosing an antibiotic, your healthcare provider first considers the type of bacteria involved. The type of bacteria can help determine which antibiotic drugs to choose, since not all antibiotics affect all bacteria.

Read Also: How Long Should A Uti Last With Antibiotics

Popular Articles
Related news